Parental Access to Student Records

In the normal course of the school year, many parents stop into the school office and ask to examine their child's school records. In the majority of cases this is no problem, and the examination of records is done with ease. Generally the only delay is if the person responsible for school records, the Principal, is out of the building.

The situation is slightly different in the case of separated or divorced parents. On November 5, 1981, the Custody and Grandparent Visitation Act was signed into law becoming effective January 4, 1982. This law states that in cases where parents are separated or divorced, the school must provide access to their child's records...unless the custodial parent can provide a court order denying such access to the non-custodial parent.

In order to comply with the law and provide services to parents, the school will use the following procedure for parental access to student records:

  1. Parents should come into the office and request to see their child's records. The records will be reviewed in the presence of the school principal or his/her designee. The purpose of this is not to delay the review, but to help the parent understand the information contained in the records, to answer questions or to correct errors, if any, found in the records.

  2. In cases where the parents are separated or divorced, the parent who has custody should provide the school with legal proof of that custody.

  3. When the non-custodial parent requests access to a student's records, the school will first contact the custodial parent and apprise that parent of the request. The custodial parent will have five days to get a court order denying access to the child's records by the non-custodial parent. If after five days no court order is provided to the school, the non-custodial parent will be granted access to the child's records as outlined in number one above.

  4. In cases where the parents are separated, and custody has not been determined by the courts, the school has no choice but to provide access of student records to both parents. Procedures outlined in number one above will be used.